Muskoka Wildlife: Gray Treefrogs

Posted by Katherine Bialczyk on Sep 26, 2011 4:39:00 PM

tree frog 1Every time I go to my cottage in Muskoka I see a classic tribute to Muskoka's wildlife - a Treefrog! Or at least I see them every time I try to BBQ (they like to hide in there at night), and I hear them all the time! Now as the temperature drops I wonder where do they go? 

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Habitat: These treefrogs may be found on trees and shrubs near permanent water. They prefer mature or second growth woodlands although they may also inhabit orchards. They are rarely seen outside the breeding season.

tree frog 5Treefrogs are usually little gray or green beasties that must bury themselves soon under leaves. Unlike frogs, they don't bury themselves in mud. I will be so sad to see them go, or rather, not see them. The bright yellow flag on their upper thigh is amazing.

tree frog 3So long, tree frogs. I will miss you. Fall approaches, and time to sleep. The dead, dry leaves are falling off the branches. I know snow will fall before you know it. I adore each season and the gifts change brings.

Topics: Gravenhurst history, muskoka wildlife, things to see in muskoka

Gravenhurst Farmer's Market

Posted by Roman Bodnarchuk on Sep 13, 2011 7:00:00 AM

Tomorrow at 9:00 AM is Gravenhurst's Famer's Market

Come Savour the Flavour of Muskoka. Established in 1992 in the heart of Ontario's scenic cottage country, the Gravenhurst Farmers' Market has become one of the region's most popular attractions.

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As many as 80,000 local residents, cottagers, and tourists frequent the market annually to partake in a broad array of fresh Ontario produce, arts and crafts, and special events. More, visitors can enhance their market experience by exploring Gravenhurst's many excellent shops and restaurants, or enjoying a swim and relaxing picnic at one of the community's lakeside parks.

And following the market visitors can cruise Muskoka's world-famous lakes aboard the Royal Mail Ship Segwun, North America's only remaining fully-operational steamship. All together, a visit to the Gravenhurst Farmers' Market can blossom into a full-day adventure your entire family is sure to enjoy.
September Schedule
Wednesday, Sep 07, 2011 9:00am to 2:00pm
Wednesday, Sep 14, 2011 9:00am to 2:00pm
Wednesday, Sep 21, 2011 9:00am to 2:00pm
Wednesday, Sep 28, 2011 9:00am to 2:00pm

Contact Information & Location
Organizer:Gravenhurst Farmer's Market
Contact:Barry Anderson
Phone:705-327 8107
Address:Gravenhurst, Ontario

Topics: gravenhurst events, Gravenhurst, Lake muskoka, Muskoka Wharf, Muskoka Wharf events, Gravenhurst history, farmers market

Muskoka Wharf - The Full Story

Posted by Roman Bodnarchuk on Aug 15, 2011 11:52:00 AM

We felt lazy and relaxed. How could you not? The breezes are balmy, the living is laidback, and everything revolves around the sparkling water. And yet there is an unmistakable energy here, a vibrancy that says Gravenhurst’s Muskoka Wharf is the place to be.

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Gravenhurst’s fortunes have always been linked to its waterfront. The history of Gravenhurst and its wharf march in lock step, developments in one having always affected the other. As went the Muskoka Wharf, so went Gravenhurst.

In the very beginning, the wharves built by James McCabe along the shores of Muskoka Bay served as stepping-off points into the wilds of Muskoka. Businesses in the form of hotels, taverns, stores and shipping interests began to cater to this slow but steady trickle of homesteaders, and consequently Gravenhurst developed along the shores of Lake Muskoka. It should therefore come as little surprise that Gravenhurst was originally known as McCabe’s Landings.

Activity along the Wharf reached a fevered pitch once the railway reached Gravenhurst in August 1875. On September 28, the first railway hissed and steamed its way into town. Two months later, a spur line down to the lakeshore was built.

It was this time that Muskoka Wharf truly was born. The southestern shoreline of Muskoka Bay was artificially extended with massive cribwork and fill to form a true wharf within the sheltered inlet. 

After the railway was introduced, the wharf was a bon to industry and settlement in the region. Hundredes if not thousands, of settlers passes through every year for almost two decades, and were joined by an equal number of summr tourists.

Muskoka Wharf remained a hive of activity and industry until the dawn of the automobile in the 1930s, driving trains, steamships and the wharf to the edge of extinction. One by one, trains to Gravenhurst were cancelled and ships were retired from service.

It was inevitable that Gravenhurst would feel the loss, and not just on a sentimental level. The wharf had brought prosperity, luring thousands of tourists even in the waning years of the steamship era. In time Gravenhurst recovered, but it was never the same.

Unitl now, that it. In the last decade, an 89-acre development featuring boutique shops, restaurants, playgrounds and sporting fields, and lakeside boardwalks has restored a luster to Muskoka Wharf not seen since the days when Gravenhurst was known as the Gateway to Muskoka.

The development has transformed a moribund waterfront into perhaps the coolest spot in Muskoka. At one point in the past Gravenhurst was the heart f the region. Its pulse slowed for a while with the demise of the lumber industry and the decline of the steamships, but now the beat is most definitely back.

This story is a collection from the original article written by Andrew Hind and Maria Da Silva.

For a full copy of the story read Andrew Hind and Maria Da Silva’s article on page six of Sideroads of Muskoka – Summer 2011.

Topics: Gravenhurst, Muskoka, Muskoka Wharf, Gravenhurst history